Kitchen faucet repair

Most modern faucets have the breakable parts (valves and washers) in a replaceable “cartridge”. The best place to get replacements is directly from the manufacturer. Some manufacturers, like Price Pfister, warrant their faucets for life to the original purchaser, and consider you the original purchaser as long as you have the owners manual. Save those owners manuals, you might be able to get replacement parts for the cost of shipping.

Tools need: Flathead screwdriver, phillips screwdriver, large adjustable wrench, silicone plumbers grease.

Turn off the water, both the hot and the cold. You will find the valves under the sink or in the basement.

Turn on the kitchen sink faucet to drain it and make sure you turned off the water to the right faucet.

Before you start dissassembling things, make sure you plug the drains. You never know what little parts are going to fall into the sink, or worse, the garbage disposal.

Remove the handle. This model has a little plastic cap that covers a phillips screw, some have an allen key screw. Loosen the screw enough to lift the handle off. You shouldn’t have to take the screw out all the way.We have a shallow well, and you can see iron stains where the water leaked onto the faucet. Note to self:next time get a chrome faucet, or fix it sooner.

Remove the plastic cover. The cover has notches. Insert a flat screwdriver and give it a gentle, counter clockwise turn. (lefty loosey)

If you click on the image, you might be able to see the water that had leaked out. I used a towel to soak it up as I worked.

Remove the metal cap that holds it all together. You might have to hang onto the faucet nozzel to have enough leverage to loosen it.
The cartridge was broken and came apart and I had difficulty removing the remaining pieces. I resorted to a large pair of channel locks. Not my favorite tool, but the long handles gave lots of grip on the plastic. I kept working around the cartridge shell, lifting until it popped out.
With the cartridge out, clean out the faucet with a clean rag. Try to remove anything that is slimy or gritty. We want the replacement cartridge to get a nice water tight seal.
Apply plumbers silicone grease to the ribber seals . On this cartridge, it’s the two blue rings and the black ring around the cartridge. This will allow everything to go together easier and help make water tight seals.
Cartridge installed. I found two spacers that went between the metal cap and faucet, so I put them back when I put everything back together.
Replace the metal cap and tighten. (righty tighty)
Replaced the plastic cap and tighten.
Replace the handle and tighten the phillips screw. If you took the screw all the way out when taking the handle off, start it in the hole before putting the handle back on.
Make sure the faucet handle is in the off position and turn on the water to the faucet.
Dry everything and check for leaks.
Dry everything and check for leaks.

This repair took about 15 minutes. I was taking pictures and trying to work while dinner was being made, so your time will be different.

This website has exploded views, complete with labeled parts, of various Price Pfister faucets.

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A computer geek with a taste for sustainable living, organic food, green products, buying local, woodworking, bicycling, running, yoga, recycling and doing-it-yourself.