Category Archives: Woodworking

Gary’s SawBuck

Gary e-mailed photos of his completed sawbuck and it looks fantastic. He had some very specific requirements and modified the plans a bit. His description is here:

We are full-time motor homers in a 38′ Holiday Rambler Endeavor diesel pusher where everything has a place and everything MUST be in its place. So a saw buck must be small, fairly lightweight and portable.

I changed the angle of the 2″ X 4″s to be 35 degrees, instead of 45 degrees, in the “crotch” that holds the logs. That made the “footprint” a little narrower, but it is still stable. The wood that I cut into lengths are almost always tree limbs and never bigger than 9″ or 10″ in diameter.

Per your suggestion, I used a 1″ X 6″ oak board to “tie” the two sets of “legs together, with 2-1/2″ Kreg pocket screws. After I glued (Gorilla glue) the 1-1/4” pivot dowels into the legs, I “pinned” the pivot dowels with a 5/16″ X 3-1/2″ cross-dowel to prevent the pivots from ever “spinning” in the leg.

I’ve had a stroke and am mildly handicapped, so simple projects like this are about the limit of my abilities. Prior to my stroke, I’ve built furniture, garages, houses, etc. But, I really enjoyed this project.

Gary “FritoBandito” F.

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Thanks for the photos Gary! I love to see how these projects turn out. They are all a little different and all wonderful.

Here are the original sawbuck plans.

Sand and Water table

Drew from Connecticut stopped by with photos of his completed Sand and Water table.  It looks great!  He added wheels to the inside of two of the legs and a lid to keep the outdoor critters out of the sand.  Drew says the wheels make it easier to move when fully loaded and by putting them on the inside, they are out of the way.

Very nice work Drew, and thanks for the photos.

Sandtable1

Sandtable2

Water colors as wood stain

For a recent project, I wanted a nice dark wood stain.  Everything I found in the stores contained V.O.C.s.  Convinced it just didn’t have to be so, my wife suggested that I use water color paints, followed by a coat of oil finish.  It works fabulously.  This photo shows oak and pine boards, the pine has been stained with water colors and a shelf that was water colored and oiled.

Mini sawbuck plans

The other day, the kids asked why I didn’t bring my sawbuck when we went to cut wood. While the sawbuck does make wood cutting much easier, it is a little large to carry around, especially when I have to climb up and down hills. I liked their idea though, so I decided to build a to build a mini, portable sawbuck.

read the full plans here.

Fellow blogger Jason stopped by to say that he completed two sets of sawbucks.  He modified the plans a bit, making one for cutting 16 inch pieces and one for 12 inch pieces.  He used reclaimed wood, which is way cool. Click on the Jason’s photo above for more pictures.  Thanks Jason!

Scythe, wooden tools and making adjustments

I purchase a scythe from Lehman’s and found it a bit awkward. I ordinarily don’t have problems with tools from Lehman’s so I thought I just needed to learn to use the tool. After reading this page on snath making at scytheconnection.com I realized that it was the tool that needed to change, not me.

The snath is the wooden handle of the scythe. Being made of wood, it should be very easy to change or duplicate.

According to scytheconnection.com, the grip where you put your hand should be about 2 inches above where you hips bend. The grip on the Lehman’s snath was much higher than this and angled away from the blade. I took the snath apart and made a new piece to connect the grip to the snath. In the photo on the right, the piece on the left is the original. The one in the middle is my first prototype, made from plywood and the last was made from oak. Click on the image for a better view. You can’t see it in the picture, but the tenon on Lehman’s piece was only cut on one side. The new one I cut from Oak was cut on both. This should make it sturdier, and help it last longer.

Because of the curve, the grip was now placed forward by about 4 inches. This made all the difference. The scythe was easier to balance and it was easier to keep the blade parallel to the ground. If you click the image below, you can see how everything goes together.

I love wooden tools because they are so easy to change and improve.

The Scythe Connection

I have used a scythe for a while now and thought I had learned all I needed to know. After looking at Scytheconnection.com, I can tell I have a lot to learn.

There is a buyers guide that is quite through, with information on where you can buy a blade and snath (handle). A good page on selecting the right blades is here. They recommend two blades, a longer blade for open fields and a shorter one for trimming work.

The blade and snath I ordered from Lehmans (brush blade / standard American handle) has always always felt a little out of balance and I thought it just took getting used to. It may be that it just isn’t quite right.

There is even a section on making your own snath (handle). I may give it a try, just to see the difference.

Here is an earlier post of mine on mowing with a scythe…


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